The Kensington Review

2 August 2004

Latest Commentary:
Bush Begins Counter-Attack -- The confetti had yet to be swept off the convention center floor in Boston when Mr. Bush left his ranch to begin campaigning for election to the office he now holds thanks to the Supreme Court. It has been a very frustrating time for the White House with Mr. Kerry and the likeable Mr. Edwards not putting a foot wrong while going through the nominating formalities. Apparently, the Bushies are so frustrated that they aren't thinking straight. Their latest efforts to slam Senator Kerry may blow up in their faces.

France Sends Troops to Stop Sudan Genocide -- The next time an American decides to rant about the French being gutless, unprincipled jackasses the retort just might be, "So where are your troops for Sudan?" After the UN Security Council voted to get really mad at the Khartoum government in a month if doesn't shape up (the word "sanctions" was removed to secure passage), the French flew in humanitarian aid to the victims in Darfur, while the Americans did -- nothing.

US Economy Slows on Oil Price Increases -- The latest figures on the growth of the US economy are worrisome. The Commerce Department announced that the second quarter GDP growth rate was a tolerable 3.0%, but that was off from the 4.5% in the first quarter, and it failed to meet the experts' expectations. Consumer spending dropped significantly, and this stemmed from rising oil prices. In the 1970s, this condition was dubbed stagflation.

Iron Mike Tyson Completely Corroded -- At 38 years old, Mike Tyson has come to the end of a boxing career that at one time night have been greater than Ali's. The man who took him out in the fourth round, justly unknown British heavyweight Danny Williams, will go down as an answer to a Trivial Pursuit question, but showed no real great ability. He could take a punch, but he is no boxer. Against Iron Mike Tyson, he didn't need to be one.

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Copyright 2004 by The Kensington Review , J. Myhre, Editor. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written consent.